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Facts about North Korea that are terrifyingly strange

 

 North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia, in the northern part of the Korean Peninsula. Pyongyang is both the nation's capital as well as its largest city. To the north and northwest the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok (known as the Yalu in China) and Tumen rivers. The country is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two.

North Korea, independent since 1948, is not recognised by Japan and South Korea.

 

In North Korea, the year is counted after the birth of its founder, Kim II-Sung. In 2013, it was the year 202.

 

 

 

Marijuana is legal and is not even classified as a drug in North Korea.

 

 

 

North Korean archaeologists announced the world in 2012 they "discovered" lair of the UNICORN ridden by legendary King Tongmyung 2000 years ago.

 

 

North Koreans may only choose from 28 approved haircuts.



In the last 60 years, over 23,000 North Koreans have defected to South Korea. Only two South Koreans have gone to the North.



In 1974, Kim Il-sung took 1,000 Volvo sedans from Sweden to North Korea and never paid for them.



North Korea has its own operating system called Red Star OS.



Possessing Bibles, watching South Korean movies and distributing pornography may be punished with death in North Korea.



North Korea's space agency is called "NADA", which in Spanish means "nothing."



Wearing jeans is illegal in North Korea.



In 1953, a North Korean fighter pilot defected to South Korea with his MiG-15 and was rewarded with US$100,000 by the U.S.



North Korea uses a fax machine to send threats to South Korea.



According to a textbook in North Korea, Kim Jong Un learned to drive at age 3.



North Korea hosts the World's Largest Stadium seating 150,000 people.  



When a single anti Kim Jong Il graffiti was found in Pyongyang, North Korea, in 2011, they locked down the entire city for 3 days.



Only 4 modern countries were never colonized by Europe: Japan, Korea, Thailand and Liberia.


North Korea follows a “three generations of punishment” rule, meaning that if one person violated the law or sent to prison, their children, parents and grandparents are sent to work with them.

 

 

 

 The North Korean government strictly controls all levels of education. The literacy rate of those aged 15 and older in North Korea is 99%.

 

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